Lunar Notes: An Interview with Featured Writer Sayuri Ayers

Sayuri_SunPhoto

Sayuri Ayers is a native of Columbus, Ohio. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Entropy, The Pinch, Hobart, Ghost City Review, and others.  In 2016, Green Bottle Press released her chapbook Radish Legs, Duck Feet.  Haunt her at sayuriayers.com.

Why poetry? What pulled you in, and who was the very first poet you read/heard who just clicked?

Poetry is strange and lovely. It’s a beast in a jeweled box. Through poetry, there are infinite ways to engage the reader through imagery, tone, sound, and use of white space.

The first book of poetry I read was by Sharon Olds. I discovered Satan Says in the basement of my college’s library. As a science major, I was taking a poetry class as an elective. I remember sinking to the floor in awe as I read Old’s poem, “Monarchs.”

As I’ve gotten older, I’ve gravitated towards Li-Young Lee’s poetry, especially his collections Rose and Book of My Nights.  What I admire most about Lee’s work is its ability to transport the reader through striking imagery.

If you were the last person on earth, and you pulled the last book from a pile of ash and cinders, what do you hope it would be? Why?

I absolutely love the book of Ecclesiastes. The questions about existential meaning are essential, especially for the last person on earth.

What space does/should poetry occupy right now?

The expansion of poetry into the hybrid forms has been fascinating to watch. The subversion of genres speaks to the shifting of cultural and political borders. I can’t wait to see how poetry will demand more space and transform personal and public landscapes.

What was the first piece you ever had published? Are you the same person who wrote it, and if not, how have you changed?

I first published “Garden of Delights” in my college’s literary journal, First Circle. In some ways, I’m still the same person. As a reader and writer, I’m drawn to strong imagery and narrative. Over time, my generous mentors and teachers have taught me to be more critical of my work, and how to better honor the work of other writers.

What are you working on right now? What is the center or focus of your work right now?

I’m working on a hybrid manuscript that weaves prose poetry together with lyric essay. The manuscript navigates the landscape of motherhood and mental illness. I’m focusing on how images can be repeated, then presented in different forms.

Name some poets youre really excited about right now. Who do you have on your shelf/in your ear/on your mind?

There are so many poets that I’m excited about!  I’m currently reading the debut book by Ruth Awad, Set to Music a Wildfire, which chronicles her father’s survival of the Lebanese Civil War. Geoff Anderson is a poet from Columbus, Ohio. He’s one of my favorite writers/people.  His collection, Humming Dirges, was recently released by Paper Nautilus. I’ve also been enjoying Li-Young Lee’s newest collection, The Undressing.

What’s the biggest adventure youve had so far? What comes next?

My biggest adventure has been becoming a mother. Writing as a parent has been a series of late nights eating ramen over a keyboard and frantically searching diaper bags for lost scraps of poems.  My most creative and productive years followed the birth of my son. I wouldn’t trade these years or him for anything.

Next, I’m hoping to mentor future readers and writers. I plan to volunteer at a local elementary school as a reading tutor this coming fall.

What advice would you give a poet just starting out? What advice would you go back and give your younger self?

Shape your writing life according to your goals/purpose as a poet. Take time to celebrate your successes and the successes of others.  Read, read, read. Don’t give up.

You can read Sayuri Ayers’ work in the fifth issue of Night Music Journal, which will be released May 17th.

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